How does it help us?

Establishing the Ecological Footprint can help us get to grips with questions like how much natural resource do we have at our disposal? How much of it are we using? How fast? And how fast are we running out of it? 
Can you imagine living in a world without fresh food, fish, timber or fiber? A world with such scarcity would have profoundly affect the functioning of businesses, communities and countries. 
The stark fact is that globally we are living off the planet’s ecological credit card. We're consuming natural resources faster than they can be produced. We don't know how long the planet can sustain this level of overexploitation. Already there are signs of some of the impacts of having a high Ecological Footprint: rising global temperatures and climate change; biodiversity loss; deforestation; collapsing fisheries; growing water and food insecurity. Left unchecked, this will affect, people, economies and countries. 
The Ecological Footprint tool can also make another fascinating calculation: it can tell us how many planet Earths we would need to sustain our way of life at the present rate!  It does this by comparing the world’s biocapacity of 2.1 which is equivalent to one planet with a nations biocapacity.
Without this vital information we cannot develop strategies that will truly help us combat the problems we are experiencing with our Ecological Footprint credit crunch. Left unaddressed, the reality that could face is a world with no natural resources
Ecological Footprints are measured at the point of consumption. For example, when our power stations produce electricity for our homes, they release carbon dioxide emissions into the atmosphere impacting our nation’s carbon Footprint, However as we consume this electricity  to watch our TV, use our ACs and lights, then that becomes part of our individual Footprint (and our responsibility). The power station would only be responsible for the energy that it consumes on the site. 
Footprint and biocapacity - supply and demand
To calculate the Footprint, we need to compare the demand on natural resources - which is what we call the Footprint - with the supply of natural resources, which is what we call the Biocapacity.  

Establishing the Ecological Footprint can help us get to grips with questions like how much natural resource do we have at our disposal? How much of it are we using? How fast? And how fast are we running out of it? 

Can you imagine living in a world without fresh food, fish, timber or fibre? A world with such scarcity would profoundly affect the functioning of businesses, communities and countries.  

The stark fact is that globally we are living off the planet’s ecological credit card. We're consuming natural resources faster than they can be produced. We don't know how long the planet can sustain this level of overexploitation. Already there are signs of some of the impacts of having a high Ecological Footprint: rising global temperatures and climate change; biodiversity loss; deforestation; collapsing fisheries; growing water and food insecurity. Left unchecked, this will affect, people, economies and countries. 

The Ecological Footprint tool can also make another fascinating calculation: it can tell us how many planet Earths we would need to sustain our way of life at the present rate!  It does this by comparing the world’s biocapacity of 2.1 with the world’s Ecological Footprint of 2.7. Thus all nations in the world currently live and consume the equivalent of 1.3 planets worth of natural resources (2.7/2.1 = 1.3). This can also be done for nations and is calculated for the UAE in the section ‘What is the Ecological Footprint of the UAE?’

Without this vital information we cannot develop strategies that will truly help us combat the problems we are experiencing with our Ecological Footprint credit crunch. Left unaddressed, the reality that could face is a world with no natural resources